New Round of Achievement First Webinars

February 11, 2010

Hot off the presses: Check ’em out…

Leadership Opportunities with Achievement First

We know that effective school leaders can make a significant impact on school culture and student achievement. Join us to learn about our unique leadership opportunities and hear from current school leaders about their daily lives as leaders within our network. Liz Mitha will discuss opportunities for the 2010-2011 school year and our application process.

Hosted by Liz Mitha, Director of Recruitment
Tuesday March 2; 8:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. EST
RSVP to
https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/860715001

High School Teaching Opportunities with Achievement First

Achievement First teachers work hard to ensure that all our scholars are on the path to college starting in Kindergarten. We now have two high schools, one in New Haven and one in Brooklyn, that are truly ensuring our scholars receive an excellent education all the way through graduation. During this session, learn what teaching in an Achievement First high school is all about. The session will include information on training, professional development opportunities and how our schools are founding new high school curriculum and programs to ensure a rigorous and well-rounded experience. Pamela Bookbinder will also discuss opportunities for the 2010-2011 school year and our application process.
Hosted by Pamela Bookbinder, Talent Recruiter

Tuesday, March 23; 8:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. EST

RSVP to https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/368953697

Become a Summer Teaching Resident!

The Achievement First Teaching Residency provides an opportunity for excellent rising second year educators to teach Summer Academy at a high-performing urban charter school in Connecticut or New York.  Achievement First will offer learning and development and provide Residents with instructional resources to advance student achievement in their own classrooms.  Residents will be observed by outstanding instructors and will receive one-on-one feedback to improve their teaching.  As part of the Achievement First Team, Residents will have the opportunity to connect with excellent teachers to further their professional growth.
Applications are due by March 31, 2010.  Early applications are strongly encouraged.
Please apply online at www.achievementfirst.org or e-mail recruitment@achievementfirst.org for more information.

Achievement First is Hiring for the 2010-2011 School Year!

Achievement first is already looking for great educators for the 2010-11 school year! We are currently hiring for teachers and school leaders for all grade and subject levels for our Hartford, New Haven, Bridgeport, CT and Brooklyn, NY schools. Go to www.achievementfirst.org to apply online or learn more today.

Calling all Sue Lehman Nominees
Achievement First is offering a $1,000 signing bonus to all past Sue Lehman nominees. To learn more, please email us at recruitment@achievementfirst.org or apply online at www.achievementfirst.org. We deeply believe in the power of great teachers— join us today.

Visitor Days
Are you interested in seeing a high-performing elementary, middle or high school? This month, we are opening our doors to anyone interested in a firsthand look at Achievement First to see how our scholars excel at such high levels. You will have time to observe classrooms and leave with new ideas to bring back into your own classroom.
March 1-31; 8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
Brooklyn, NY
RSVP to recruitment@achievementfirst.org (Include your grade level, content area and possible dates for your visit)


Urban Teacher Training Collaborative – Tufts University

February 10, 2010

Check out this innovative new program out of Tufts University in Medford, MA. Partnering with three small Boston Public Schools, this program utilizes the “residency” model and a distinct focus on understanding communities AND curriculum as equal parts of an effective teacher.

View a student made short film on the program.  The film interviews teachers of color in the program and examines the ways race and ethnicity intersect with educational outcomes for their students.


Brown University Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT)

November 4, 2009

Brown U shieldLEARN. LEAD. TEACH. The Brown University Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) program is a 12-month (June to May) graduate program for students wishing to pursue careers as teachers. Leading to teacher certification in elementary (grades 1-6) or secondary English, History/Social Studies, or Biology/Science (grades 7-12) education, the program combines practice and theory through coursework and student teaching placements. Multiple student teaching placements provide a variety of learning contexts for each MAT student. The program is intentionally small in size, ensuring that students receive personal guidance from professors and mentor teachers. Financial aid is available in the form of tuition scholarships and is awarded on the basis of financial need, past performance and evidence of potential success in the program. The strongest applicants may apply to the Urban Education Fellows program, which provides tuition forgiveness in exchange for a commitment to teach in Providence-area urban public schools for three years following graduation.

 

For more information, visit our website at www.brown.edu/Departments/Education/TE and/or contact Teacher_Ed@brown.edu. Applications are due by February 1, 2010.


Standford History Education Group :: Reading Like a Historian

October 1, 2009

Pretty exciting video about high school history through primary documents. ..

“Rather than being asked to memorize, these students are asked to think.”


EDWeek on TFA Training–You’ve come a long way, babe!

September 15, 2009

tfa_logoJust to follow up on the post this morning. EdWeek released an article documenting the major overhaul of their teacher training program that has gone on over the past several years. The major move is from “teacher satisfaction” to “teacher efficacy.” I think Breakthrough is poised for that move…

The role of the program directors has changed dramatically over the past five years, even as the organization has boomed in size, to about 7,000 corps members.

At one time, program directors had more of a support role—“to keep corps members satisfied,” in Ms. Stone’s words. Now, they are charged with enabling the members to develop into highly effective teachers.

TFA’s shift over the past decade toward measuring and promoting its teachers’ ability to boost student performance has caused the organization to reconfigure not just program directors’ roles, but nearly all its other support components.


Gates $$$ Going Toward ExcitingTeacher Efficacy Project

September 15, 2009

Remember when I posted that article about the growing tiff between the NYC Dept. of Education the Teacher’s Union…Here’s the other side to that:

And now, in yet another example of unlikely alliances in education, the New York City Department of Education and the United Federation of Teachers have joined to participate in a $2.6 million two-year study paid for by the Gates Foundation to try to figure out just how teachers should be evaluated.

In the project entitled “Measures of Effective Teaching” researchers will measure teachers (who sign up for the program and are compensdated) through a variety of lenses–test scores, observations, teacher mentor and support, resource allocation and school culture.


From the Rubber Room to Teacher Quality

September 1, 2009

New YorkerCheck out the New Yorker’s recent article on Joel Stein, New York City’s Chancellor of the Department of Education and his fight for high quality teaching. It starts out in perhaps the most tragically funny place in all of education, the “Rubber Room.” It goes on to discuss major teacher quality reform.

By now, most serious studies on education reform have concluded that the critical variable when it comes to kids succeeding in school isn’t money spent on buildings or books but, rather, the quality of their teachers. A study of the Los Angeles public schools published in 2006 by the Brookings Institution concluded that “having a top-quartile teacher rather than a bottom-quartile teacher four years in a row would be enough to close the black-white test score gap.”